Blog Archive

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Trump wants to deliver GOP nomination speech at White House. Is that legal?

President Trump is now mulling the White House as a locale for his Republican National Convention acceptance speech. He has already canceled plans to host festivities in Jacksonville, Florida and Charlotte, North Carolina.

“Well we are thinking about it. It would be easiest from the standpoint of security,” he told “Fox and Friends” Wednesday. “We are thinking about doing it from the White House because there’s no movement. It’s easy, and I think it’s a beautiful setting and we are thinking about that. It’s certainly one of the alternatives. It’s the easiest alternative.” The president later added that while some speeches will be virtual, others will be live at different locations in Washington, D.C. “I’m going to do mine on Thursday night and that will be live.”

But his suggestion has raised legal and ethical questions about hosting campaign activity on the federal government grounds.

The Hatch Act forbids the

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TikTok lovers rage against Trump threat of US ban

A TikTok star pounds a beat as she weaves lyrics mocking the idea of US President Donald Trump banning the short-form video sharing app.

The “Trump Freestyle” post Monday by @maya2960 quickly racked up more than a million views and 500,000 “likes” on the popular platform owned by China-based ByteDance.

“Didn’t think this through, little Donny, did you? Not much of a businessman,” she rapped.

“You can ban this app, there’ll be a new one. There’s supply where there’s demand.”

The lyrics included a promise that TikTok users would not go down without a fight, citing First Amendment protections against government censorship of free speech.

Another video snippet racking up views was captioned “Me trying to convince Trump to let us keep TikTok” and showed a woman coloring her face orange and building a brick wall.

American comedian Elijah Daniels used Twitter to bid farewell to his TikTok followers, giving

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Who else might President Trump ban?

US v China app
US v China app

TikTok’s time in the US may be running out, with President Trump and other senior officials talking of an imminent ban.

But other Chinese-owned apps and software-based services could also be targeted.

On Sunday, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo alleged that some of the Asian nation’s technology companies were “feeding data directly to the Chinese Communist Party”.

So who else is at risk?

The most obvious target is Tencent’s WeChat, which was the only product that Mr Pompeo called out by name in addition to TikTok.

WeChat is sometimes described as being a social network, but it’s really so much more – offering ways to make payments, run additional mini-programs, find dates and get the news, in addition to messaging and other social activities.

It’s perhaps best thought of as being a kind of secondary operating system that sits on top of iOS or Android.

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Grifters Are Using Targeted Snapchat Ads To Scam Teenage Trump Supporters

. (Photo: Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/HuffPost; Photos: Snapchat)
. (Photo: Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/HuffPost; Photos: Snapchat)

An attention-grabbing Snapchat ad features a cartoon version of President Donald Trump dancing through fireworks and a cascade of dollar bills to the tune of “Hail to the Chief.” Bold text against a flashing red, white and blue background promises a “FREE Trump 2020 Bundle” of MAGA-themed merchandise and even $10 in hard cash — all for a fee of just 69 cents to cover shipping. 

The offer is targeted to male youths who live in red states, watch political news and enjoy online shopping, according to Snapchat data. It could be hard to resist for many of the app’s overwhelmingly young users.

“Please support President Trump & Traditional American values by claiming Your FREE Trump 2020 Bundle before this weeks [sic] 33,500 units are gone,” says the text on the ad’s landing page. A checkout button is labeled, “YES, I SUPPORT

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Microsoft Tries To Salvage Deal To Buy TikTok, Appease Trump

(Bloomberg) — Microsoft Corp. Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella spoke with U.S. President Donald Trump on Sunday to salvage the company’s effort to buy TikTok’s operations in the U.S. and several other countries.

Talks to buy the music video app will move quickly “in a matter of weeks” and are expected to be completed no later than Sept. 15, Microsoft said in a statement. The company will continue to engage Trump and the U.S. government.

The purchase would result in Microsoft owning and operating TikTok in the U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Microsoft said it may invite other American investors to take minority stakes in the company, which is owned by one of China’s largest tech companies, ByteDance Ltd.

Microsoft pledged to add more security, privacy and digital safety protections and ensure that all private data of Americans be transferred back to the U.S. and deleted from servers outside

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TikTok sale uncertain as Trump ban looms: reports

San Francisco (AFP) – Negotiations for Microsoft to buy the US operations of Chinese-owned TikTok are on hold after President Donald Trump threatened to bar the social media app and came out against the sale, the Wall Street Journal reported Saturday.

Trump has pledged to get tough on the massively popular video-sharing app, which US officials have said could be a tool for Chinese intelligence — a claim the firm, owned by Chinese internet giant ByteDance, has repeatedly denied.

While there has been no sign yet of the ban he threatened on Friday to impose, his words were reportedly already adding to uncertainties for TikTok.

“Before Mr. Trump’s remarks, the two sides believed the broad strokes of a deal could be in place by Monday,” the paper reported on a possible TikTok-Microsoft sale, citing unnamed sources.

It also said Trump’s threats and opposition to the deal had prompted TikTok to

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TikTok teens are making memes saying they’ll show up at the White House to confront Trump over app ban

Many TikTok creators respond to the president's proposed TikTok bans with memes and jokes.
Many TikTok creators respond to the president’s proposed TikTok bans with memes and jokes.

TikTok

  • President Donald Trump on Friday told reporters he would take action to ban popular app TikTok as early as Saturday.

  • Trump over the past month has joined other US officials in expressing security concerns over the app’s Chinese ownership and suggested the service is sharing user data with the Chinese government, though the app’s owner has denied doing so. 

  • While some TikTok creators encouraged their fans to follow them on their other social media accounts, others made memes or plans to set up a virtual private network so they could still use the app after a ban.

  • A TikTok spokesperson thanked users for their support in a video statement Saturday, and said the app is “here for the long run.” 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump on Friday told reporters that he

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Florida deaths rising sharply but nation’s new cases trending down; Herman Cain dies; Trump suggests delaying election

New U.S. COVID-19 cases showed signs of trending downward Thursday while deaths in Florida rose sharply one day after the U.S. death toll surpassed 150,000.

In Washington, D.C., President Trump suggested delaying the November election, saying reliance on mail-in voting due to the pandemic would be “inaccurate and fraudulent.”

And the Commerce Department issued a record-breaking report of the U.S. economy, announcing that the gross domestic product contracted at a staggering seasonally adjusted annual rate of 32.9% in the April-June period.

In Florida, reeling from sharply rising daily death reports, the state’s largest school district announced that it will begin the school year virtually on Aug. 31. This despite a push by Gov. Ron DeSantis to have school districts provide an in-classroom options.

Here are some significant developments:

  • Democratic leaders and Trump administration officials said they were far apart on a $1 trillion stimulus package. Without it, there won’t be

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Trump administration petitions FCC to reinterpret Section 230 rules

“Many early cases, understandably protective of a nascent industry, read section 230’s protections expansively. But, given the maturing internet economy and emergence of dominant social media platforms, the FCC should re-examine section 230, as well as other provisions of the Communications Act of 1934. The FCC should determine how section 230 can best serve its goals of promoting internet diversity and a free flow of ideas, as well as holding dominant platforms accountable for their editorial decisions, in new market conditions and technologies that have emerged since the 1990s.”

In a statement posted on Twitter, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr supported the petition. “[It] provides an opportunity to bring much-needed clarity to the statutory text,” he wrote. His fellow commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, however, said the FCC shouldn’t take the bait.

She said in a statement:

“While social media can be frustrating, turning the FCC into the President’s speech police is not

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Twitter and Facebook become targets in Trump and Biden ads

CHICAGO (AP) — Social media has become the target of a dueling attack ad campaign being waged online by the sitting president and his election rival. They’re shooting the messenger while giving it lots of money.

President Donald Trump has bought hundreds of messages on Facebook to accuse its competitor, Twitter, of trying to stifle his voice and influence the November election.

Democratic challenger Joe Biden has spent thousands of dollars advertising on Facebook with a message of his own: In dozens of ads on the platform, he’s asked supporters to sign a petition calling on Facebook to remove inaccurate statements, specifically those from Trump.

The major social media companies are navigating a political minefield as they try to minimize domestic misinformation and rein in foreign actors from manipulating their sites as they did in the last U.S. presidential election. Their new actions — or in some cases, lack of

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