Blog Archive

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Here’s who’s getting Rainbow Six Siege’s new hard breaching gadget

Attacking team composition in Rainbow Six Siege has, for years now, depended largely on the choice of who to bring along as a hard breacher, particularly for certain bomb sites. Teams on offense know that they’ll need a Thermite, Hibana, Ace, or Maverick if they’re going to get through reinforced walls. With Operation Shadow Legacy, that’s about to change: now, eight more attackers will have the option to bring a hard breaching gadget along with them.

The hard breach charge gadget was revealed at the Six August 2020 Major. It’s an optional secondary gadget that creates a hole big enough to crawl or vault through. It takes three seconds to set up, and six more to set off, so it’s not as though it’s as good as the options available to the dedicated hard breacher operators. But according to the latest batch of Designer’s Notes from the Siege team, the

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I’m a journalist who lived through Kashmir’s traumatic internet blackout, which started one year ago. Here’s what it’s like to have your freedoms ripped away for 213 days.

kashmir internet shutdown
kashmir internet shutdown

REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

  • On August 5, 2019, India’s Hindu nationalist government revoked the autonomy of the Muslim-majority Jammu and Kashmir region by scrapping Article 370, a constitutional provision that grants special status and allows the Indian state to make its own laws. The day before, it had cut off phone signals, mobile data, and broadband internet.

  • Majid Maqbool is a freelance journalist from the region and the opinions expressed are his own. He says Kashmir’s internet blackout traumatised families, devastated businesses, and cut millions of people off from the outside world. 

  • A year on from when 213-day blackout started, he writes about what it was like to live through — and about how the media celebrated Kashmiris’ loss of freedom.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

This week marks one year since I and seven million other Kashmiris were subjected to the longest-ever internet blackout in a

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Here’s How 4 Brides Pulled Off Mid-Pandemic Weddings

If 2020 was a normal year, we’d be taking advantage of the summer season to write a whole lot about weddings and wedding dresses. But, with a global pandemic canceling almost everything about life as we knew it, we’re not. Instead, our carts are filled with bike shorts, WFH-friendly office chairs, and face masks (of both the beauty and PPE varieties). We do know, however, that people are still getting married — and that means they’re still finding ways to browse, try on, and ultimately purchase nuptial-ready frocks. Which begs the question: how exactly are they accomplishing this? We started asking around and as we talked to different women across the country, we learned a lot more than how they wedding-dress shopped during such strange times. The women whose weddings were derailed by COVID-19 still managed to have them and, although different, their ceremonies were just as special as what

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We’ve been working from home for 5 months. Here’s what we learned.

We've been working from home for 5 months. Here's what we learned.
We’ve been working from home for 5 months. Here’s what we learned.

Like many, many others around the world, we’ve been working from home for close to six months here at Mashable due to the coronavirus pandemic. We miss our coworkers and our lunch spots, but we’ve managed to get by knowing we’re fortunate to be able to work from home at all.

Since we work on the internet, a big part of “getting by” has been learning the myriad ways tech can help and hinder us throughout the day. With that in mind, here are just a few of the basics that we and other remote workers have had to internalize and make part of our daily routines while our lives were turned upside down by the pandemic. We know you’d prefer to be back at the office or out with your friends, but take these tips to heart

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Here’s what to know in South Florida on August 1

We’re keeping track of the latest news regarding Hurricane Isaias in South Florida and around the state and Caribbean. Check back for updates throughout the day.

Hurricane Isaias more likely to scrape Florida coast instead of hitting it, NHC says

11:40 a.m.: Odds of a Florida landfall for Hurricane Isaias appear to be decreasing as the storm made landfall on Andros Island in the Bahamas Saturday morning.

Saturday morning updates from the National Hurricane Center showed the predictions for worst impacts have inched north and later, leaving Miami-Dade and Broward comfortably out of the cone. Despite that, Isaias’ windfield is large enough that tropical-storm-force winds could be felt as far as Homestead, although the chances of that keep getting lower with each update.

Read the story here.

One county’s test-run for managing a hurricane during a pandemic

11:30 a.m.: Isaias brought a test-run for Miami-Dade’s plans to manage a hurricane

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What is ‘Blackfishing’? Here’s why a Black publication was criticized after employing a white dating columnist

Some critics have accused a white writer of "blackfishing." Here's what that means. (Illustration: Getty Images)
Some critics have accused a white writer of “blackfishing.” Here’s what that means. (Illustration: Getty Images)

MadameNoire, a self-described “space for the unapologetic black woman,” is sticking with its mission in a new way this week — by refusing to apologize to angry readers who accuse the publication of “digital blackface” and “blackfishing,” after discovering that one of its top dating columnists is a white woman.

“She’s in digital blackface because she always uses stock photos featuring Black women/families/couples and uses ‘sis’ and the inclusive ‘we’ as if she’s a Black woman,” blasted one Facebook user about the writer, Julia Austin. “In addition, she’s been a content contributor mostly for ‘Black’ platforms including Black America Web, NewsOne and a plethora of Black radio stations.” Others echoed the criticism online: “This woman has literally hundreds of articles she wrote for MadameNoire and in a lot of them she speaks on

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Here’s what every parent needs to know

Yahoo Life is committed to finding you the best products at the best prices. The product written about here is offered in affiliation with Yahoo Life’s parent company, Verizon Media.

Kids are prime targets for identity theives because they have no credit histories and no one is checking. (Photo: Getty/iStockphoto)
Kids are prime targets for identity theives because they have no credit histories and no one is checking. (Photo: Getty/iStockphoto)

One day, a 12-year-old receives a notice from the IRS informing her that she hasn’t paid her income taxes for last year. Meanwhile in the next town over, a 2-year-old is being hounded by debt collectors for an outstanding credit card balance of $15,000. 

No, it’s not the setup for a new episode of ‘The Twilight Zone.’ These scenarios—and worse—happen in real life all the time. More than one million children were victims of identity theft in 2017, according to a report by Javelin Strategy & Research. Cleaning up this kind of mess isn’t easy, either: Child identity theft cost

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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Once an immigrant has a green card, here’s what they have to do to become a U.S. citizen

Becoming a United States citizen provides rights and privileges such as voting, traveling with a U.S. Passport, bringing family members permanently to the United States, sponsoring citizenship for children born abroad and obtaining government benefits.

Since applications for citizenship are currently taking up to two years, it is important that eligible immigrants submit their petitions as soon as they meet the requirements, immigration advocates say.

The process often requires help from an immigration attorney, but some legal permanent residents try to obtain U.S. citizenship through naturalization on their own.

The recently relaunched U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website contains numerous resources to guide foreign nationals throughout the naturalization process.

The immigration agency outlines the following 10 steps to naturalization:

Citizenship through U.S. parents

According to USCIS, “There are two general ways to obtain citizenship through U.S. citizen parents: at birth, and after birth but before the age of 18.”

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I’m a former CIA analyst trained to spot fake news. Here’s how you can do it, too.

In early 2017, I watched from my desk at the CIA as the world learned Russia had waged an influence campaign targeting the U.S. presidential election months before. As an intelligence analyst, I worked in a world where countries often used covert action against each other to influence events, outcomes, and policies, but the scale and scope of Russia’s actions to try to help Donald Trump elected were unprecedented. As the Intelligence Community’s declassified assessment from 2017 stated, Russia’s interference was “a significant escalation” in the country’s long-running effort to undermine the United States.

Since then, I have seen this revelation lead to a (mostly) collective panic, but essentially no government action. That panic has manifested in a growing distrust of institutions we traditionally counted on for information, like the media, fear that social media conversations are orchestrated by “Russian bots,” the mainstreaming of conspiracy theories, and in the most

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