Blog Archive

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Briones: Classes in Manila public schools can start with gadgets at hand

MANILA, Philippines — There is no reason for public schools in Manila to stop classes after the local government provided gadgets to students as well as teachers to augment distance learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Education chief Leonor Briones said on Wednesday.

“I am informed, hindi ito biro-birong investment galing SES (Special Education Fund), na ang Maynila naman ay nagkokolekta. Ito ay nag-post ng P1.2 billion so hindi biro ito, mag-distribute ng isang dosenang computer. Ito ay P1.2 billion worth of assistance to DepEd (Department of Education) and to our children beneficiaries,” Briones said during a speech aired through a video call at the turn over of gadgets ceremony at Aurora Quezon Elementary School Covered Court.

(I am informed that this is not just a simple investment from the SES, which Manila has collected. This posted P1.2 billion so this is not easy to distribute one dozen computers. This is

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State Gives Benicia Guidance To Start School Classes

BENICIA, CA — If the Benicia Unified School District wants to hold classes in schools instead of online this fall, state epidemiologist Dr. Erica Pan on Tuesday outlined the state’s waiver process for K-6 schools.

Solano County is currently on California’s COVID-19 coronavirus “Watch List.”

Pan, the former health officer for Alameda County, said K-6 schools can apply for a waiver to begin in-person instruction if they are located in a county that meets several criteria in spite of being on the state’s Watch List.

Individual schools must submit a site-specific plan to keep students and staff safe, taking into account input from interest groups like labor unions and parent organizations. Those schools must then publicly post their plan and submit it to their local health officer to apply for a waiver.

California Department of Public Health officials will then review each application on a case-by-case basis, taking into account

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Schools seeking alternative to remote learning move classes outside

DETROIT — With just days to go before the start of the new academic year, schools around the country are rushing to gather materials they never thought they would need: plexiglass dividers, piles of masks and internet hot spots to connect with students remotely.

And then there are schools that have an even more unusual list.

The Detroit Waldorf School in Michigan is buying carriage bolts, berry bushes and 8,000 square feet of cedar wood.

The San Francisco Unified School District has been busy gathering tree stumps.

And the Five Town Community School District in Maine is buying tents, yurts and enough all-weather snowsuits for each of its elementary school students.

These schools and districts are all laying the groundwork to move at least some instruction to outdoor classrooms. They’re making a bet that the lower risk of disease transmission in the open air, and the extra space outside for

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State Gives Martinez Guidance To Start School Classes

MARTINEZ, CA — If the Martinez Unified School District wants to hold classes in schools instead of online this fall, state epidemiologist Dr. Erica Pan on Tuesday outlined the state’s waiver process for K-6 schools.

Contra Costa County is currently on California’s COVID-19 coronavirus “Watch List.”

Pan, the former health officer for Alameda County, said K-6 schools can apply for a waiver to begin in-person instruction if they are located in a county that meets several criteria in spite of being on the state’s Watch List.

Individual schools must submit a site-specific plan to keep students and staff safe, taking into account input from interest groups like labor unions and parent organizations. Those schools must then publicly post their plan and submit it to their local health officer to apply for a waiver.

California Department of Public Health officials will then review each application on a case-by-case basis, taking into

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State Gives Mount Diablo Unified Guidance To Start School Classes

CONCORD, CA — If the Mt. Diablo Unified School District and its neighboring school districts want to hold classes in schools instead of online this fall, state epidemiologist Dr. Erica Pan on Tuesday outlined the state’s waiver process for K-6 schools.

Contra Costa County is currently on California’s COVID-19 coronavirus “Watch List.”

Pan, the former health officer for Alameda County, said K-6 schools can apply for a waiver to begin in-person instruction if they are located in a county that meets several criteria in spite of being on the state’s Watch List.

Individual schools must submit a site-specific plan to keep students and staff safe, taking into account input from interest groups like labor unions and parent organizations. Those schools must then publicly post their plan and submit it to their local health officer to apply for a waiver.

California Department of Public Health officials will then review each application

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State Gives Cotati-Rohnert Park Guidance To Start School Classes

ROHNERT PARK-COTATI, CA — If the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District wants to hold classes in schools instead of online this fall, state epidemiologist Dr. Erica Pan on Tuesday outlined the state’s waiver process for K-6 schools.

Sonoma County is currently on California’s COVID-19 coronavirus “Watch List.”

Pan, the former health officer for Alameda County, said K-6 schools can apply for a waiver to begin in-person instruction if they are located in a county that meets several criteria in spite of being on the state’s Watch List.

Individual schools must submit a site-specific plan to keep students and staff safe, taking into account input from interest groups like labor unions and parent organizations. Those schools must then publicly post their plan and submit it to their local health officer to apply for a waiver.

California Department of Public Health officials will then review each application on a case-by-case basis, taking

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New Britain students may take classes in-person, online or on a hybrid schedule

Parents of New Britain students will have the option this fall to keep their children home for all-online education, send them to school for traditional classes or try a mix of both.

In explaining the school district’s plan for teaching 10,000 students during the pandemic, Superintendent Nancy Sarra emphasized that parents will have choices.

One option that might help working parents and guardians is a hybrid system: They may design a schedule for their children to attend in person on certain days, and take classes virtually on the others.

If families choose in-person classes, they should prepare their children for a daily schedule very different than usual.

“All of our desk in the classrooms will be 3 feet apart, all students except for preschool must wear a mask and a face shield,” Sarra said in a recent online town hall for city parents.

Staff will maintain distance from students, kindergarten

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A Few Colleges Have Announced Tuition Discounts For Virtual Classes

As July nears its close, the question of college tuition becomes increasingly urgent. Most campuses will offer virtual classes, if not in addition to socially-distance in-person teaching, then instead of it. Understandably, if students have to front the costs of internet connection, a laptop, a quiet space to attend a virtual class, and have no access to the amenities of a college campus, tuition for a fully virtual semester should reflect that. Alas, colleges are insisting on charging full tuition for virtual classes. Except for a sensible few.

According to CNBC, Hampton University of Virginia; Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia; and Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas will offer discounted tuitions. All three of these are HBCUs (historically Black colleges or universities). Hampton University is cutting tuition for the fall semester by 15%. Spelman College is cutting tuition costs by 10% for the whole year whole, and Paul Quinn

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College Is More Than Classes

The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally restructured higher education for at least the next semester. Come fall, many college students are yet again facing a life off-campus, sitting in front of a screen. Despite the obvious differences between online and in-person education, colleges and universities are largely set on maintaining — if not raising — tuitions. This raises the question: Is an online education worth the same as one in person? It also raises a broader, more important question: What is the value of a college education?

Before I try to answer them, let me show my cards. I am a rising senior at Harvard, where only first-years and students with extraordinary circumstances will return to campus in the fall and only seniors will return in the spring. Harvard’s residential capacity has been topped at 40 percent, and all classes for all students — including those living on campus —

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Online Summer Classes Discounted for Coronavirus

Keep learning from home this summer.

Online classes can teach learners of any age new skills, aid in a career transition or offer an accessible way to explore a new topic. This summer, some online platforms — including those that provide massive open online courses, or MOOCs — are offering discounts to users because of the coronavirus pandemic. Even as states begin to lift stay-at-home orders, many families will remain close to home this summer and millions of Americans are still unemployed or facing reduced hours at work. Consider browsing the online classes on these platforms this summer to make use of any free time and pick up some new skills or credentials.

Coursera

Since June 1, Coursera, an online learning platform, has offered free access to more than 3,800 courses and numerous guided projects, specializations and certificates for current undergraduate or graduate students and recent graduates. Students must enroll

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