How Joe Biden, Democrats Plan to Win Back Internet in 2020

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Joyce Greenberg Brown first learned about political organizing from Martin Luther King Jr. in 1957, when he visited her youth group at a Philadelphia YWCA. She worked for George McGovern in Pennsylvania in 1972 and managed field offices in Florida for Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns. She was so dedicated to Hillary Clinton that after Clinton lost, she dyed purple and green streaks into her white hair–the colors of the original suffragist movement–to protest Donald Trump.

If it weren’t for COVID-19, Brown would be working at a field office for Joe Biden in Florida, where she lives. But the pandemic has prevented the kind of campaigning she’s done for decades. There are no rallies in packed stadiums, no handshakes at parades, no photo lines or kaffeeklatsches. Instead, Brown, 76, is at home, spending hours using Google Voice to text Floridians about voting by mail, sending them a link

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Inside the Democrats’ Plan to Win Back the Internet

Joyce Greenberg Brown first learned about political organizing from Martin Luther King Jr. in 1957, when he visited her youth group at a Philadelphia YWCA. She worked for George McGovern in Pennsylvania in 1972 and managed field offices in Florida for Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns. She was so dedicated to Hillary Clinton that after Clinton lost, she dyed purple and green streaks into her white hair–the colors of the original suffragist movement–to protest Donald Trump.

If it weren’t for COVID-19, Brown would be working at a field office for Joe Biden in Florida, where she lives. But the pandemic has prevented the kind of campaigning she’s done for decades. There are no rallies in packed stadiums, no handshakes at parades, no photo lines or kaffeeklatsches. Instead, Brown, 76, is at home, spending hours using Google Voice to text Floridians about voting by mail, sending them a link where

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Inside one school’s unorthodox reopening plan

DETROIT — With just days to go before the start of the new academic year, schools around the country are rushing to gather materials they never thought they would need: plexiglass dividers, piles of masks and internet hot spots to connect with students remotely.

And then there are schools that have an even more unusual list.

The Detroit Waldorf School in Michigan is buying carriage bolts, berry bushes and 8,000 square feet of cedar wood.

The San Francisco Unified School District has been busy gathering tree stumps.

And the Five Town Community School District in Maine is buying tents, yurts and enough all-weather snowsuits for each of its elementary school students.

These schools and districts are all laying the groundwork to move at least some instruction to outdoor classrooms. They’re making a bet that the lower risk of disease transmission in the open air, and the extra space outside for

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Plan Your Outdoor Wedding Summer Of 2020 In Orange County

ORANGE COUNTY, CA— Who wants to get married outside in Orange County…at the Honda Center? Yes. Once again, in an effort to halt the spread of COVID-19, Orange County Clerk-Recorder Hugh Nguyen is relocating his department’s marriage services to Honda Center in Anaheim.

It’s the second time in 2020 that weddings will take place at the “ticket booth” style kiosks at the Honda Center. Each service is by appointment only, starting at 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, for the foreseeable future.

The happy couples must first complete their marriage license application and make an appointment online at the following link: www.ocrecorder.com/services/marriage.

No walk-in service will be available at this time.

“COVID-19 numbers are not getting better and demand for marriage services isn’t slowing down,” said Clerk-Recorder Hugh Nguyen. “Most of our neighboring county clerk-recorders have closed their offices, which will likely lead to an increase in demand

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As U.S. coronavirus surges, Trump officials press back-to-school plan

By Doina Chiacu and Rich McKay

(Reuters) – With just weeks to go before U.S. schools begin to open, federal health and education officials on Friday stressed the need for children to get back into the classroom despite parents’ fears about safety as coronavirus infections surge.

Administration officials said reopening schools was critical for children’s mental and emotional well-being, as well as to allow parents to get back to work to boost the economy, a priority for President Donald Trump as he seeks re-election in November.

Dr Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said at a news briefing the CDC had released additional documents for administrators and parents.

“They’re all put out with the intent to help facilitate, as was mentioned earlier, the full reopening of schools for face-to-face learning,” he said.

The CDC, the nation’s health protection agency, added the documents after Trump called

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Just For Laughs Sets Online-Only Festival Plan For October

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The Montreal-set Just for Laughs Festival is going virtual for its 2020 edition this fall, setting a two-day online event for the annual A-list comedy showcase for October 9-10. In April, organizers had postponed the 38th edition of the confab to the September amid the coronavirus pandemic; it had originally been set for mid-July.

Programming lineups will be announced in the weeks to come, but the Just For Laughs Group said the offering will be a mix of free and interactive online gatherings, conversations, panels, performances and events. JFL Montreal’s ComedyPRO, Toronto’s JFL42 and ComedyCon will also be a part of the lineup.

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The previously set The Ethnic Show, The Nasty Show and the Bill Burr concert show will reschedule to 2021.

“More than ever, we want to maintain our position as an industry leader by creating innovative comedy events

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Teachers sue Florida governor over school reopening plan

The Florida Education Association, a union representing 145,000 educators, filed a lawsuit on Monday against Governor Ron DeSantis and the state’s Department of Education in an attempt to stop schools from reopening at the end of August. The lawsuit argues Florida’s plan to reopen schools is unsafe due to the coronavirus pandemic, and therefore violates the state constitution, CBS Miami reports.

“The Florida Constitution mandates ‘[a]dequate provision shall be made by law for a uniform, efficient, safe, secure, and high quality system of free public schools,'” the lawsuit says. “The Defendants’ unconstitutional handling of their duties has infringed upon this mandate and requires the courts to issue necessary and appropriate relief.”

The lawsuit also names Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez as defendants. 

“The governor needs to accept the reality of the situation here in Florida, where the virus is surging out of control,” FEA

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How will the L.A. Phil carry on amid COVID-19? Dudamel and Smith lay out a plan

A "What's Next" banner with Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall. <span class="copyright">(Mark Swed / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A “What’s Next” banner with Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall. (Mark Swed / Los Angeles Times)

“What’s Next” looms large in the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s posters for its 2019-20 season. They are still up at Walt Disney Concert Hall, and they can seem more like a question now that the orchestra on Thursday confirmed the inevitable cancellation of concerts for the rest of the year.

Originally, of course, “What’s Next” was meant as an answer to the question of what could possibly follow the L.A. Phil’s unprecedented, epic centennial season, which confirmed its position as the world’s most artistically venturesome and socially committed major orchestra. But the COVID-19 pandemic turned out to be the answer no one planned for, L.A. Phil Chief Executive Chad Smith said in a Zoom interview in which he was joined by Music and Artistic Director Gustavo Dudamel. They talked about plans they want

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Trump’s plan to expel foreign students was an attack on U.S. science leadership

The Trump administration told international students at U.S. colleges and universities that they couldn't stay in this country if they did not attend classes this fall in person. Shown are students at UCLA. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
The Trump administration told international students at U.S. colleges and universities that they couldn’t stay in this country if they did not attend classes this fall in person. Shown are students at UCLA. (Los Angeles Times)

From the Trump administration perspective, suddenly forcing international students out of the country must have looked like three wins in one. It would have ejected mostly non-European immigrants, advanced the administration’s new demand that schools reopen their campuses despite the threat posed by COVID-19, and financially and academically harmed universities, which Trump views as bastions of liberal indoctrination.

Not to mention striking a blow against science, and especially against the nation’s leadership in scientific research, which has come about largely because of its globally admired university programs in engineering and laboratory science.

At least the odious preliminary directive was withdrawn Tuesday, though we don’t know how new students and those whose visas are ending

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