NC parents give online application system thumbs up

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Parents said on Monday that they are elated with the elimination of long queues at schools when they have to apply for placement for their children.

PARENTS in the Northern Cape have indicated that the provincial Department of Education’s new online school application system is a move in the right direction.

Parents said on Monday that they are elated with the elimination of long queues at schools when they have to apply for placement for their children.

One parent, Joylene Marais, said the application process was not complicated. Marais added that she also made preparations in advance.

“I set my alarm for midnight but saw that the system will only officially go online at 9am. I typed in the website earlier and waited for the system to go online. I applied for Grade R and Grade 5 and the process was easy and completed within a few minutes. I applied

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These online learning tips will help parents prepare for a successful school year, even if it is virtual.

Many of the nation’s largest school districts plan to begin the fall semester online-only. As schools consider reopening, children face a future in which online courses will probably be part of the curriculum. To make the best of this situation, here are some tips to help your child adapt to learning from home.

Studies show that in online learning, parents often take on the role of a teacher. Making school a priority will help keep kids from treating online learning as a vacation.

Research suggests that some types of parental participation have a greater impact on children’s academic achievement than others. One analysis showed that schoolchildren benefit from discussions about learning and school-related issues with their parents and from joint readings.

Reduce distractions

A report in 2016 found that students spent about one-fifth of class time on laptops, smartphones and tablets, knowing that doing so could harm their grades. They

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‘I don’t know what I’m supposed to do.’ Parents in distress over school opening online

The Los Angeles Unified School District and United Teachers Los Angeles agreed upon a deal for online learning just before the first day of school on Aug. 18. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
The Los Angeles Unified School District and United Teachers Los Angeles agreed upon a deal for online learning just before the first day of school on Aug. 18. (Los Angeles Times)

How do we start school online? I have five children and one Wi-Fi hot spot. I can’t answer the questions my children are asking. The kids have way too much free time. What took so long to come up with this schedule? We need help.

As a more detailed picture of the new online-only school day in Los Angeles emerges, a crescendo of concerns and questions is arising among parents, whose children will be expected to fire up computers in less than two weeks for the opening of the 2020-21 school year amid a global pandemic.

The broad outline of a tentative agreement between the teachers union and school district is clear: Students and parents will follow a predictable

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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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Homeschool pods are gaining traction amid worries about school reopening; here’s how parents are getting the finances to work

Katrina Mulligan says her decision to organize a homeschooling “pod” – a modern version of a one-room schoolhouse, with a small group of parents splitting the cost of hiring teachers – wasn’t done lightly.

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the nation, she’s grown increasingly wary about her public school’s plan for getting kids back in the building.

“I don’t think it’s a great idea to send your kids to school in the middle of the pandemic,” says Mulligan, 40. “A lot of us started freaking out.”

Katrina Mulligan and her daughter, November 2019 in Manassas, Virginia.

At the same time, she adds, she and her husband found it difficult this spring to juggle working from home while managing their 6-year-old daughter’s virtual schooling. That experience, plus concerns about school safety, prompted her family to connect with four other families in their hometown of Alexandria, Virginia, to

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Are you worried about your elderly parents? 8 tips to help seniors stay mentally acute in isolation

Fitness coordinator Janet Hollander leads session of Balcony Boogie from outside Willamette Oaks in Eugene, Ore. for residents isolated in apartments during pandemic, April 21, 2020.
Fitness coordinator Janet Hollander leads session of Balcony Boogie from outside Willamette Oaks in Eugene, Ore. for residents isolated in apartments during pandemic, April 21, 2020.

Just what we need: Another reason to fear and loathe COVID-19.

If your loved ones are old, ill and confined to an assisted living or senior care home, you already know they are especially vulnerable to the killer virus, as the devastating death statistics in nursing homes attest. 

But you might not realize the efforts to protect them by isolating them has potentially dangerous consequences, too.

This became alarmingly obvious to Mary Ann Sternberg after her longtime partner, Ron, a retired psychologist who has Parkinson’s disease, was confined to the grounds along with the rest of the residents of his high-quality assisted living community in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, after they all went into lockdown in March. 

The residents couldn’t go out and their relatives

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Back-to-School Essentials for Busy Parents

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

For parents, the COVID-19 pandemic has made back-to-school plans for their children particularly stressful this year.

Many school districts are combining in-class and online learning, which means kids’ schedules will be even more hectic than usual. Parents, then, will need everything from that critical morning coffee to a good night’s rest in order to survive. 

So Consumer Reports has come up with an array of back-to-school items that should help parents through the ordeal. These products  will also help keep the entire family fueled, fed, and healthy.

Cuisinart PerfecTemp 14 Cup Programmable DCC-3200

CR’s take: There’s nothing like a perfect cup of coffee to jump-start even the most jam-packed day. A traditional drip coffee maker, the Cuisinart PerfecTemp 14 Cup Programmable DCC-3200 makes plenty of java, thanks to its 14-cup glass carafe. It features programming, auto-shutoff, a cleaning indicator,

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Day cares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his preschool before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among the millions of parents grappling with sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage among politicians and school officials on fall reopening plans. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care for 100,000 children to help

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Daycares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his pre-school before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among millions of parents grappling with the pros and cons of sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage between politicians and school officials on fall re-opening plans, while New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care

Read More