Milwaukee schools face challenges with virtual learning plans

CBS News is chronicling what has changed for the lives of Americans in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic.  

Joyce Peoples, a middle school English language arts teacher in Milwaukee, said she thought that she might spend a few weeks away from the classroom when Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers shut down schools in mid-March as COVID-19 started spreading across the country..

“We were thinking, OK, we’ll be closed for [a few] weeks and then spring break and then just going to wait for things to calm down,” Peoples said. Her students — and 75,000 others in Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) — did not return to the classroom. 

When it was clear students wouldn’t be returning any time soon, challenges arose, including reaching students’ families, communicating plans for the road ahead and making sure students had devices and internet access for virtual learning. Peoples said remote online learning in the spring provided

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How to step up your programming skills with Python machine learning

With so many books and online courses on data science and machine learning, it’s very hard to navigate your way and find the best resource to take the next step in honing your artificial intelligence skills. Previous installments in this series explored introductory material on data science and machine learning.

In this post, I will look at Python Machine Learning, Third Edition by Packt, an excellent resource for developers who already have basic knowledge of ML and data science.

Bring your math and programming skills

Off the bat, Python Machine Learning is not for amateurs. The authors assume you have a solid command of Python. The book uses some of the advanced list and collection functions. There’s also (thankfully) a fair bit of object-oriented programming techniques that enable you to use reusable components for your machine learning programs.

You’ll also need to have a basic knowledge of data science

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6 Ways Parents Can Deal With The Anxiety Of Remote Learning … Again

When schools around the country abruptly stopped in-person learning last fall, many parents had one endpoint in mind: September. We’d slog through the Zoom classes and meltdowns and clinginess, push through the summer, and by the time fall rolled around, we’d be able to send our children back to school and reclaim some level of normality.

But recently a growing number of major school districts, from Los Angeles to Houston, have announced plans to start the new academic year online. New York City has said children will be in the classroom, at most, three days a week. 

For some parents, the extension of online learning into the fall, as the coronavirus pandemic rages on, is a relief.

For others, it is devastating — and for many, it is a bit of both. 

“It is an impossible situation,” said Annie Snyder, a senior learning scientist at McGraw-Hill. “There is no good

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L.A. Latino, Black students suffered deep disparities in online learning, records show

A gate in front of Los Angeles High School was locked on July 13. <span class="copyright">(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A gate in front of Los Angeles High School was locked on July 13. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

More than 50,000 Black and Latino middle and high school students in Los Angeles did not regularly participate in the school system’s main platform for virtual classrooms after campuses closed in March, a reflection of the deep disparities faced by students of color amid the COVID-19 pandemic and of the difficulties ahead as L.A. Unified prepares for continued online learning.

The numbers, reflected in a first-of-its-kind report by Los Angeles Unified School District analysts examining student engagement during campus closures, paint a stark picture of students in the nation’s second largest school district struggling under the new pressures of online learning.

Nearly every category of students — sorted by race, income and learning needs — included large numbers who did not regularly participate in distance learning. But low-income students and

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L.A. Latino, Black students suffered deep disparities in online learning, district records show

A gate in front of Los Angeles High School was locked on July 13. <span class="copyright">(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A gate in front of Los Angeles High School was locked on July 13. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

More than 50,000 Black and Latino middle and high school students in Los Angeles did not regularly participate in the school system’s main platform for virtual classrooms after campuses closed in March, a reflection of the deep disparities faced by students of color amid the COVID-19 pandemic and of the difficulties ahead as L.A. Unified prepares for continued online learning.

The numbers, reflected in a first-of-its-kind report by Los Angeles Unified School District analysts examining student engagement during campus closures, paint a stark picture of students in the nation’s largest school district struggling under the new pressures of online learning.

Nearly every category of students — sorted by race, income and learning needs — included large numbers who did not regularly participate in distance learning. But low-income students and Black

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NC Gov. Cooper to reveal schools plan Tuesday as some families choose online learning

As Gov. Roy Cooper prepares to announce his plans Tuesday for North Carolina’s public schools this fall, thousands of Wake County families already have made their decision about how their children will learn.

Cooper will announce at 3 p.m. which reopening plan North Carolina public schools will use for the fall semester. The press conference will be live streamed at ncdps.gov/storm-update.

Meanwhile, the Wake Virtual Academy has received 18,000 applications since the application period opened Friday morning, Lisa Luten, a district spokeswoman, said Monday. More than 10% of Wake’s 161,907 students have already opted for the new virtual program, instead of returning to class in-person.

Wake Superintendent Cathy Moore said that number could reach 30% based on a district survey of parents.

“It is not for every student,” Moore said at a news conference Friday. “So we want to make sure that our families are thoughtfully considering that option and

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These 2 books will strengthen your command of Python machine learning

Mastering machine learning is not easy, even if you’re a crack programmer. I’ve seen many people come from a solid background of writing software in different domains (gaming, web, multimedia, etc.) thinking that adding machine learning to their roster of skills is another walk in the park. It’s not. And every single one of them has been dismayed.

I see two reasons for why the challenges of machine learning are misunderstood. First, as the name suggests, machine learning is software that learns by itself as opposed to being instructed on every single rule by a developer. This is an oversimplification that many media outlets with little or no knowledge of the actual challenges of writing machine learning algorithms often use when speaking of the ML trade.

[Read: How the Dutch government uses data to predict the weather and prepare for natural disasters]

The second reason, in my opinion, are

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