Greeson: Cracker Barrel meets beer barrel, helping kids get internet access, Big Ten football finances, obit observation

hafiz wae

Well, the coronavirus and the demand for business owners to find ways to make up lost revenue have hit us in ways that maybe we could have expected and in ways that no one could have expected. For Pete’s sake, a local McDonald’s closed.

So let’s talk here.

Who in a world before coronavirus would have ever imagined that the need for a revenue bump would put Cracker Barrel in the beer and wine business?

That’s right, Cracker Barrel, the home of home-style cookin’ across the country, is on tap to offer beer and wine in its dining rooms — even right here in its home state of Tennessee.

Man, think of the options. Farm-raised catfish, and Boone’s Farm. Biscuits and Budweiser.

Chicken and cheers, y’all.

 

Speaking of revenue

OK, there was something lost amid the news of Big Ten football returning to the field next month.

Under the cover

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Internet unearths decade-old interview with Ardern, Bridges on kids’ TV show

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Simon Bridges, Jacinda Ardern posing for the camera: Watch: The young politicians spoke to in beTWEEN


© in beTWEEN
Watch: The young politicians spoke to in beTWEEN

An interview with Jacinda Ardern and Simon Bridges from a decade ago has resurfaced online, showing the two young up-and-comers discussing what politics and Parliament is like. 

The clip is from the show in beTWEEN, a TV show aimed at nine to 13-year-olds. Bridges and Ardern feature on a 2010 episode all about politics – while Ardern was still a Labour list MP and Bridges just the National representative for Tauranga. 

Internet unearths decade-old interview with Ardern, Bridges on kids’ TV show

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The two fresh-faced politicians joke about debates in the House, with a 30-year-old Ardern saying they usually sit behind a table so she can “kick Simon in the shins”.

“My legs are covered in bruises!” he laughs.

Bridges says his first experience of politics was watching people in his neighbourhood put

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Remote learning turns kids into zombies because we’re doing it all wrong

“Hey mom! There’s someone leaving a garbage bag on our front porch,” shouts my sixth grader from his makeshift home office in the living room. Scooping the lopsided bag off the porch I notice both fourth and sixth grade kiddos are now hovering around me as if I’m Indiana Jones unearthing the Holy Grail. That small things are so gripping during this time never ceases to surprise me.

Both kids watch in anticipation as I open the bag and slowly realize what I’m unpacking. Five composition notebooks, three-quarters used. A bag of highlighters, markers and pencils with plenty of life left. And the kicker: the magnetic locker organizer. My son’s first year in middle school meant his first time having a locker. He was so proud of this small milestone on the path towards independence with the opportunity to organize his own learning in some small way. And so, the

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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The Best Blue Light-Blocking Glasses For Kids 2020

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Additional screen time because of remote learning might be affecting your child. To help, we've found some of he best blue light-blocking glasses for kids. (Photo: Chinnapong via Getty Images)
Additional screen time because of remote learning might be affecting your child. To help, we’ve found some of he best blue light-blocking glasses for kids. (Photo: Chinnapong via Getty Images)

Has your child’s screen time soared since the since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic? Between online classes, family Zoom hangouts and letting your kiddo binge “Frozen 2” on Disney+ so you can actually get some work done, you’re certainly not alone in turning to the internet these days.

If you’re worried about what all of that time in front of a tablet or computer could be doing to your kid’s eyes, you probably shouldn’t stress too much. In fact, there’s no scientific evidence that blue light from those screens causes lasting or significant damage — but it could affect other

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How kids and teens are coping with screen time as they learn during COVID quarantine

Since mid-March, when most schools around the U.S. closed due to COVID-19 precautions, kids and teens have had to quickly adapt to learning virtually — which means more sitting and more screen time. Hanging out with friends after class or on weekends became a thing of the past as health officials called for social distancing measures.

The last pandemic occurred over a hundred years ago, well before “screen-time” became a thing. Though the health implications of increased screen time among young people has been studied over the past decade, the effects of more time spent online as a substitute for in-school learning, hasn’t yet been mined.

Doctors in many fields, however, such as physical medicine, psychology and ophthalmology, are already spotting signs and symptoms that could indicate future trends of how increased screen time for virtual learning, combined with a reduction of in-person interaction, is affecting young people’s lives.

Dr.

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Open schools for younger kids, top pediatrician says

WASHINGTON — Younger children pose a smaller risk of catching and transmitting the coronavirus, a top pediatrician told Congress on Thursday, providing a scientific argument for why elementary schools could potentially open in parts of the country next month.

“School systems may consider prioritizing the return of younger children and taking additional measures to ensure physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings among older children,” Dr. Sean O’Leary told the House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education on Thursday morning. 

Kindergarten teacher Holly Rupprecht carries plexiglass panels to her room at Zion Lutheran School in Bethalto, Ill., on Monday. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Kindergarten teacher Holly Rupprecht carries plexiglass panels to her room at Zion Lutheran School in Bethalto, Ill., on Monday. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

The hearing was titled “Underfunded & Unprepared,” a sign of how House Democrats, who control the chamber’s agenda, view the matter. 

O’Leary, a vice chair for infectious disease at the American Academy of Pediatrics, also cited a South Korean

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Natural History Museum Launches Online Summer Camps For Kids

UPPER WEST SIDE, NY — With in-person summer camps and typical summer plans put on hold by the coronavirus pandemic, the American Museum of Natural History is stepping up to offer online programs for kids.

The historic museum on the Upper West Side of Manhattan recently launched a wide-range of thought-provoking online summer science camps for children between the second and ninth grade.

The online activities will include virtual hall visits, guest scientist talks, behind-the-scenes tours, and live-animal encounters. Additionally, there will be offline hands-on science projects, games, and crafts.

The camps will take place starting on July 27 and run until Sept. 2, ranging from $175 to $500 in price.

You can sign up for any of the online summer camps on the museum’s website.

Here are the different programs you can choose from:

Grades 2-3

Keys to the Kingdoms of Life

  • Session 1: Monday, July 27 — Friday,

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Millions of kids could lose access to free meals if this program expires

The Trump administration is resisting calls to make it easy for tens of millions of students to get free meals at school this year, even as childhood hunger rates have risen to the highest levels in decades.

During the spring and summer, as the coronavirus health crisis exploded, the government allowed most families to pick up free meals from whichever school was closest or most convenient without proving they were low-income. But that effort is on the verge of expiring as states prepare for children to return to school, and as school systems are pushing the federal government to continue the free meals program through the fall.

So far, President Donald Trump’s Agriculture Department isn’t on board with an extension. School leaders are now asking Congress to force the government’s hand as lawmakers buckle down to work on the next coronavirus aid package.

“It’s impossible. It’s insane,” said Katie Wilson,

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Millions of kids may lose out on free meals as they return to school

The Trump administration is resisting calls to make it easy for tens of millions of students to get free meals at school this year, even as childhood hunger rates have risen to the highest levels in decades.

During the spring and summer, as the coronavirus health crisis exploded, the government allowed most families to pick up free meals from whichever school was closest or most convenient without proving they were low-income. But that effort is on the verge of expiring as states prepare for children to return to school, and as school systems are pushing the federal government to continue the free meals program through the fall.

So far, President Donald Trump’s Agriculture Department isn’t on board with an extension. School leaders are now asking Congress to force the government’s hand as lawmakers buckle down to work on the next coronavirus aid package.

“It’s impossible. It’s insane,” said Katie Wilson,

Read More