70% of smartphones shipped in the US during the second quarter were made in China

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Distributors increased orders for ultra-low-end Android smartphones from lesser-known China made smartphones like Unimax and Wiko to match the tight consumer budgets and limited spending power of the Americans after millions of them lost their jobs and US unemployment rate crossed record high amid COVID19.

Around 70% smartphones shipped in the US during second quarter this year were made in China, says Canalys, a market analyst firm.

The number of China-made smartphones shipped in the world’s third largest smartphone market surged 10 points from 60% during the first three months of the year. The total smartphones shipped in the United States in the second quarter jumped 11% to 31.9 million from the previous quarter.

“Resumption of Chinese factory operations at the end of March and stores reopening in May and June were key contributors to sequential market growth,” Canalys said.

The federally-subsidized Lifeline program provides discounted phones for low-income Americans.

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China Embraces Bigger Internet with Virtually Unlimited IP Addresses | Voice of America

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China is pushing for the adoption of a new worldwide Internet Protocol that could make the internet bigger and faster, but also potentially less anonymous. The technology, called IPv6, is an upgrade of the internet’s architecture that would allow trillions more electronic devices to have unique addresses online.

At a global summit held in Guangdong, China, July 30-31, the country’s top internet agencies called for a new IP-only Internet. “The initiative proposed that 2020 be the first year for the global large-scale acceleration of the deployment of pure IPv6,” the state-run Xinhua news agency reported last Friday.

Designed to replace the version 4 protocol that the current internet mostly depends on, IPv6 is an upgraded version of the architecture that creates the unique “addresses” that allow computer networks around the world to communicate with one another.

A larger and faster internet, but at what cost?  

As the first widely deployed

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Christopher Nolan’s ‘Tenet’ Lands September Debut in China

Chinese moviegoers are set for a Christopher Nolan bonanza on the big screen: the director’s sci-fi epic “Tenet” will launch in Chinese theaters on Sept. 4, a week after an Aug. 28 re-release of his 2010 film “Inception.”

“Tenet,” starring John David Washington and Robert Pattinson, is expected to be the first China release for a major new Hollywood title — that the rest of the world has not already had access to for months — since the country shut theaters in January.

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“Tenet” will not have a traditional global day-and-date release. Since theaters in the U.S. haven’t opened to a significant degree, Warner Bros. opted to begin rolling out the film in international markets starting on Aug. 26. It will open in select U.S. cities over Labor Day weekend on Sept. 3. However, theaters in major domestic markets like Los Angeles and New York are still

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Unsolicited Amazon boxes now showing up at homes in the same way packages of seeds, possibly from China, have been

There’s more information to unpack in the ongoing unsolicited packages saga.

After numerous Americans reported receiving mysterious packages of seeds in the mail recently, the Better Business Bureau issued a warning about a “scam” that involves unexpected Amazon boxes showing up at people’s homes.

“Why would such merchandise be sent to you if you didn’t request it?” the bureau wrote Monday. “The companies, usually foreign, third-party sellers that are sending the items are simply using your address that they discovered online. Their intention is to make it appear as though you wrote a glowing online review of their merchandise, and that you are a verified buyer of that merchandise.”

The warning continued: “They then post a fake, positive review to improve their products’ ratings, which means more sales for them.”

The BBB said items in the boxes, which appear to be from Amazon or other retailers, can include a humidifier,

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There is still no proof TikTok is spying on you for China

TikTok, the app beloved by Generation Z, might get booted out of the US.
TikTok, the app beloved by Generation Z, might get booted out of the US.

Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images

  • The Trump administration is forcing TikTok to sell off its US business by September 15 or else face a ban, accusing it of posing a privacy and national security threat because it is owned by a Chinese company.

  • The administration has explicitly claimed TikTok spies on people but has never offered public evidence.

  • Experts diving through TikTok’s code and policies say the app collects user data in a similar way to Facebook and other popular social apps.

  • Google and Facebook by comparison almost certainly hoover up more user data than TikTok through their sprawling number of apps and services — but get less US political scrutiny on privacy.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

TikTok, the video-sharing app whose meteoric rise amongst teenage users has made it a challenger to the likes

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In Post-COVID-19 China, Beauty Is Bigger Online Than Ever

SHANGHAI — The foot traffic at Parkson was middling at best. Although the well-known department store on Huaihai Road no longer had that eerie ghost town feeling that had settled upon the entire city in February when COVID-19 was at its peak in China, it could not exactly be described as lively either.

So when I paused in front of the Shiseido counter, I had the full attention of beauty adviser Mei, who had on an orange peachy lip shade and upwardly brushed brows. With the high summer heat, she suggested I look into some brightening products for my freckles and consider the Synchro Skin foundation to beat the humidity and what seemed like the constant downpour during Shanghai’s plum rain season.

Nothing out of the usual for a beauty shopping trip, but after I agreed on the right shade of Synchro Skin and purchased it with a scan of

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China to Test Digital Yuan on Tencent-Backed Food Delivery Platform

China wants to trial its digital yuan on online food seller Meituan-Dianping, as well as another two Tencent-backed companies.

  • The Beijing-based company has held talks with the research wing at the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) over trialing the digital yuan on their platform, according to sources speaking to Bloomberg.
  • The exact details of the collaboration are not yet known; the digital yuan is formally known as the Digital Currency Electronic Payment (DCEP)
  • Listed in Hong Kong, Meituan-Dianping’s 400 million active users make it one of the largest food delivery platforms in the world; revenues in 2019 increased nearly 50% to RMB97.5 billion (~$14 billion).
  • It is backed by internet giant Tencent who had a 20% equity stake just before the 2018 initial public offering and remains a major investor.
  • Tencent, which also owns popular messaging and payments app WeChat, is set to be one of the primary commercial issuers
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China State Funds Start Selling in Warning Sign for Stock Rally

(Bloomberg) — China acted to cool the speculative frenzy in its $9.5 trillion stock market, ending a euphoric eight-day surge that had fueled worries of a new bubble in the making.

Signs of Beijing’s unease over the rally’s speed emerged late Thursday, when a pair of government-owned funds announced plans to trim holdings of stocks that soared this week. On Friday the state-run China Economic Times warned about the dangers of a “crazy” bull market, while Caixin reported that regulators had asked mutual fund companies to cap the size of new products.

Traders said the moves amounted to a warning from Chinese officialdom that the country’s world-beating equity boom has gone too far, too fast. While cheerleading from state-run media helped ignite gains at the end of last month, authorities appear keen to engineer a steady bull market rather than a repeat of the bubble that ended in a $5

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Big Tech’s China Face-Off Presages an Exodus From Hong Kong

(Bloomberg) — Facebook Inc., Google and Twitter Inc. — all of which are blocked in the mainland — are now headed toward a showdown with China that could end up making Hong Kong feel more like Beijing.

Hours after Hong Kong announced sweeping new powers to police the internet on Monday night, those companies plus the likes of Microsoft Corp. and Zoom Video Communications Inc. all suspended requests for data from the Hong Kong government. ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok, which has Chinese owners, announced it would pull its viral video app from the territory’s mobile stores in the coming days even as President Donald Trump threatened to ban it in the U.S.

Their dilemma is stark: Bend to the law and infuriate Western nations increasingly at odds with China over political freedoms, or simply refuse and depart like Google did in China a decade ago over some of the very same

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Big Tech’s China Face-Off Risks Sparking Exodus From Hong Kong

(Bloomberg) — Facebook Inc., Google and Twitter Inc. — all of which are blocked in the mainland — are now headed toward a showdown with China that could end up making Hong Kong feel more like Beijing.

Hours after Hong Kong announced sweeping new powers to police the internet on Monday night, those companies plus the likes of Microsoft Corp. and Zoom Video Communications Inc. all suspended requests for data from the Hong Kong government. ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok, which has Chinese owners, announced it would pull its viral video app from the territory’s mobile stores in the coming days even as President Donald Trump threatened to ban it in the U.S.

Their dilemma is stark: Bend to the law and infuriate Western nations increasingly at odds with China over political freedoms, or simply refuse and depart like Google did in China a decade ago over some of the very same

Read More